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Fushiki Kitamaebune Museum

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4 (84)

7-49 Fushikifurukokufu, Takaoka, Toyama 933-0112, Japan

This home belonged to the Akimoto family, who prospered in the shipping business from before the early 1800s, and was considered as very old minka home. Its rare architectural style reflects the old fashioned glory of the Kitamaebune shipping families, and in 1998 it was designated a Takaoka City Cultural Asset. The main building has a gabled roof, with some sections extending to a second floor with a main entrance on the gabled side, with the beams, struts, and black walls creating a beautiful Azumadachi style architecture. Inside, they display artifacts from the house's heyday to help recall those grander times.

hourglassDuration: 00h45min

phone+81 766-44-3999
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traditional
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clockOpening hours

Mondays: 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Tuesdays: Closed

Wednesdays: 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Thursdays: 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Fridays: 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Saturdays: 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Sundays: 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

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おとやん 3 months ago

Kitamaebune flourished from the mid-late Edo period to the Taisho period. At that time, the Sea of ​​Japan side was the main artery of national distribution. Fushiki is one of the base ports. Although it was a bit small, the museum was a magnificent house belonging to the ship owner at the time, and there were quite a lot of materials, so I learned a lot. There is also a gazebo and storehouse in the back, which are carefully maintained and have a nice atmosphere. There is a parking lot next to the building, and the entrance fee is 300 yen. There's no harm in going.

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ひさでりん 3 months ago

20231122 Most of the Kaga 1 million koku is located on the Toyama side, and Fushiki is said to have been the Maeda family's rice accumulation area. There was a parking lot at the museum, but I parked my car in the free parking lot in front of Fushiki Station where the statue of Yoshitsune Benkei is located, turned right on the way to Shokoji Temple, and arrived there in about 10 minutes in total. It is said that the Akiyama family evolved from an inn to a transportation company with a boat weighing around 500 koku. The building has a gazebo and the view from there is spectacular. On the day I went, the weather was nice and I could see the Tateyama Mountain Range perfectly. There were many rare items, such as molds for making large pots for cooking herring and actual Noshi abalone. There were also fusuma made of materials from Okinawa, which made it clear that they were used all over Japan. There were many exhibits such as advertisements for shipping companies with calendars imprinted on them, and there was a lot to see.

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eiichiro amano 7 months ago

Is this a hidden spot? There is a lot of material left on the Kitamae-bune. This is the former home of the Akimoto family, shipping wholesalers, and the watchtower still remains to watch over the sea. In the storehouse in the back, you can see many of the advertising flyer tags that were carried on ships, as well as detailed records of when new ships were built. A staff member is always on duty, and you can learn about how the Kitamaebune sailed around the country and hear stories of its rise and fall. A cultural property designated by Takaoka City.

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_r kikyo a year ago

The residence of the Akimoto family, a former shipping wholesaler, in Fushiki. It is said that it was originally an inn, but eventually became the owner of a Kitamaebune ship and played a role in the prosperity of Fushiki. One of the highlights of the building is the beautiful watchtower in the tea room, which was built to help the ship quickly find its way back to port after a long journey with an abundance of wealth. The reason why you need to find it as soon as possible is explained in the pamphlet, but it was written in the autobiography of Tsuru no Yoshie (1918-1998), the youngest grandson of Tsuruya Horita Zen'emon, who was also Fushiki's leading shipping wholesaler. I wrote about it in ``Ita Niwa.'' Yoshie Hotta is known for being admired by Hayao Miyazaki, and in fact, many people visit Fushiki to see if there is something related to Yoshie Hotta, and some guides have even met Yoshie Hotta himself. This is what is being said. However, as ``The Garden Where the Crane Was'' tells of the collapse of the Kitamaebune itself and the bankruptcy of its own family, it seems that nothing remains of the warehouse except for the one that appears to be the one in Tsuruya. According to ``Tsuru no Ita Niwa'', when the ship returned to port, all the sailors were invited to the hall of the mansion, which was 200 tatami mats when the sliding doors were removed, and a large feast was held. Restaurants, liquor stores, and the streets all come back to life, and one can imagine the town buzzing with excitement as the feast continues. There is an exhibition room of the shipping wholesaler's cards in this hall, and it makes sense that there is a print that introduces the Tsuruya Horita residence, which is more than a mansion but more like a castle. However, the vivid descriptions of how it began to tilt and finally overturn are repeated in Yoshie Hotta's later works, such as ``In Shanghai.'' On the other hand, he also co-wrote the original story for the movie "Mothra" (1961), and the villain Nelson who appears there is exactly like Colonel Muska from Laputa. It can be said that Laputa would not have been born without this crossroads in the port town of Fushiki, but now that I think about it, the watchtower here can be interpreted as a scene where Pazu and Sheeta patrol Goliath at night with a kite like a hang glider. Maybe there is.

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楓原秀 a year ago

During the Golden Week holidays, I visited the ladder from Shokoji Temple. That person received a discount on admission fees! The guide's Toyama dialect is refreshing, and you can get a glimpse of the bygone days of Fushiki Minato, which prospered with shipping. It was a very attractive building, and I was moved by the way the good old Japanese house and garden were presented. It seems to be an old house that has been open to the public since 1998, and it looks so clean that you can still see the life history of the owner, the Akimoto family. The observation tower is like a man's hideout, and the excitement is at its peak.