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Furobashi Bridge

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4 (30)

3 Chome-4 Wakauraminami, Wakayama, 641-0025, Japan

This kind of stone bridge, which typically has handrails with cloud patterns, from the Edo period are very rare except in the Kyushu region.

hourglassDuration: 00h05min

outdoor
outdoor
free
free
daytime
daytime
nighttime
nighttime
24h
24h

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4
30 review(s)
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Taketo “Tamtam” T 2 weeks ago

It's a shame that the area around it has become a normal town now, and is separated from Tenmangu Shrine, Toshogu Shrine, and Kataonami. It seems that the area is being renovated to make it more attractive, and I hope there will be a route that allows people to walk around the area a little more. It would be nice if there was a sightseeing boat from Furobashi that goes around Kataonami and goes to Wakaura fishing port.

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はるはる 3 months ago

I always cross it when walking around Wakaura. I will show you around Furobashi Bridge. Furo Bridge is a bridge where you can stay young and healthy and never grow old.Would you like to cross it together? Furobashi Bridge was built in 1851 on the orders of Harutaka Tokugawa, the tenth lord of the Kishu Tokugawa family (at the time was built during his retirement). The bridge is a stone arch and is designated as an important cultural property. Arch-shaped stone bridges from the Edo period were rare outside Kyushu. In addition, a relief of clouds is placed on the railing, creating an auspicious atmosphere. There are various theories about the origin of the name. According to the Wakayama City Museum, it was taken from the poem ``Eternal Youth'' and was written by Date Chihiro (Munehiro), who served the Kishu domain, when he was involved in bridge construction, ``I will build a bridge that will never grow old.'' It seems that there are some things left. ``Never grows old'' literally means ``not to grow old.'' As a side story Chihiro Date was a Japanese scholar and the accounting magistrate of the Kishu domain. However, after Tokugawa Harutaka's death in 1852, he lost a political battle and was imprisoned. As a result, his son Mutsu Munemitsu (Minister of Foreign Affairs during the Meiji era who worked hard to revise unequal treaties) apparently had a miserable childhood. The name Furobashi was also derived from the 39th priest of Sumiyoshi Taisha Shrine in the early Heian period. There is a tradition that it originates from a waka poem by Kuniki Tsumori. Kuniki revered Tamatsushima Hime (Itsuhime), the deity enshrined at Tamatsushima Shrine near Furobashi Bridge, the ``God of Waka.'' In the Tsumori Kunimoto collection The poem, ``Princess Tamatsushima, who grows old but never gets old and is old enough to go to Wakanoura'', worships Princess Tamatsushima's eternal youth. In any case, it is a ``bridge that never grows old.'' lastly The area surrounding Furobashi Bridge is said to be the largest tidal flat in the Kinki region, and a rocky mountain called Chara Rock creates a spectacular scenery. On the other side of the tidal flat is Kimisan Kongohoji Gokokuin Temple, the second of the 33 pilgrimage sites in the Saigoku region. Please come to Furobashi, pray for good health and longevity, and enjoy the scenery of Wakaura.

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永島良実 6 months ago

From Haneda Airport to Kansai Airport to conquer the whole country. I stayed the night before at a hotel near Izumisano Station, rented a car, and headed to Wakayama. From Kimiidera to Furobashi. I love Ishibashi like this. I didn't cross it, but the scenery was spectacular. Next, let's go to Wakayama Castle.

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KO SA 10 months ago

Furo Bridge is an important cultural property of Wakayama City. This arch-shaped stone bridge was completed in 1851, and arch-shaped stone bridges from the Edo period are said to be extremely rare outside the Kyushu region. The appearance has also changed, so please come and take a look when you're in the area. The double arch bridge in the photo was built in recent years in honor of Furobashi Bridge.

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N a year ago

It passes in front of Tamatsushima Shrine in Wakaura and hangs in front of Shiogama Shrine. Combined with the greenery of the pine trees, it has an atmosphere that complements the scenic beauty of Wakaura. It's nice to see it up close, but it's even more beautiful if you look at it from Tamatsushima Shrine's Tokuyama, Kagamiyama, and Imoseyama in the background. Next to it is Ashibe Bridge, which cars can pass through. This bridge was built by Harutaka Tokugawa, the 10th lord of the Kishu domain, as a way to access Toshogu Shrine (Wakayama). The beautiful arch part is said to have been made by Higo-Kumamoto stonework, and the embossed railings are said to have been made by Kishu Yuasa stonework. (1851, 4th year of the Kaei era) As you learn more about it and look at the scenery, you will become even more emotional.