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Daisenryo Tumulus (Emperor Nintoku Tomb)

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4.1 (759)

7-1079-1 Daisenchō, Sakai Ward, Sakai, Osaka 590-0035, Japan

Huge tomb isolated from visitors on a forested isle, viewable from a trail around the perimeter.

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4.1
759 review(s)
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Luyu Pang 8 months ago

The tomb was huge and surrounded by waterways. You can't really see much but you can appreciate how much effort people must have put into building it. There were a lot turtles, fish and some birds live there.

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m j 9 months ago

Daisen-Kofun is the largest kofun in Japan. The mound length is 486 m, and its total length, including the triple moat, is 840 m.

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TED a year ago

There is a tower in Daisen park, but it's not for observation. It's been an issue there is almost no place to see the entire view of the mausoleum. Now Sakai city is building a balloonport in the park, so we'll be able to overlook it soon! Will come again. (May, 2022)

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星野浩 4 years ago

This is the 1st biggest mausoleum for a Japanese emperor named Nintoku. One of the World Heritage Site. This is too huge to see all at a time..

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Robert Imrie 6 years ago

Daisenryo Kofun (Emperor Nintoku’s Tomb) is an immense burial mound and tomb complex. It measures 1500 feet long, 900 feet wide, 115 feet high and is enclosed by 3 moats. Covered in trees for the past century to protect it from soil erosion, it was quite the architectural accomplishment back in the 5th century. Two thousand laborers took 16 years to build it. And you’ll never see it up close. Nobody has even been near it since 1872. So it’s not a tourist attraction. Like a giant buried UFO, you can see the outline in the distance. Go for the beautiful 2.5 mile walk around the perimeter, quietly free of people. There is a museum in the park across the street and a tiny theater with a film (with English subtitles) on the history of these keyhole mounds. Don’t travel to Japan to see it but if you’re in the Kansai area (Osaka, Kyoto, Nara, Kobe) anyway, spend a morning or afternoon walking among the beautiful greenery in quiet contemplation, or learning more about a mound that’s twice the length of the Great Pyramid in Giza.